Another study about doctor-patient divide

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Surprise: doctors and patients don't communicate well. On Tuesday, Novo Nordisk released results from its "Diabetes, Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 Study" at the World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation in Melbourne, Australia. Its data gurus found that only 29% of polled diabetes patients said their healthcare teams asked their opinion on treatment regimens.

This global number is of note not only because of its geographic scope, but because so many studies indicate that communication is a key to medication adherence. Some items that could come up in doctor-patient adherence discussions: cost, complexity and access, all of which can have an impact on a patient's ability and willingness to stick with a prescribed regimen.

Further emphasizing the doctor-patient divide: the poll also showed that 84% of polled healthcare professionals “said it would be helpful if their patients prepared questions in advance of the consultation.”

Missing is whether doctors expect patients to broach the subject or whether they ask—or feel they ask—patients for their perspective or a list of questions.

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