Antidepressant use in children dropped in 04

Share this article:
Use of antidepressant drugs among children in U.S. declined 10 percent last year, according to pharmacy benefits firm, Medco Health Solutions.
The antidepressant category suffered controversy after evidence that the medications can increase the risk of suicidal thoughts within some children became public.
The falling numbers of children who take the drugs is a turnaround compared to years of upward moving amounts of prescription rates for drugs such as Eli Lilly's Prozac, GlazoSmithKline's Paxil and Pfizer's Zoloft, and the pattern of the data hint that the numbers may continue to drop.
Numerous studies have shown a three- to tenfold rise in the use of antidepressants among children between 1987 and 1996, and an additional increase of 50 percent between 1998 and 2002. There was a further increase of about 9 percent between 2002 and 2003.
Regulators have now required that pharma companies place a "black box warning" on the drugs as a cautionary step.
Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.

Email Newsletters

More in Business Briefs

FDA lifts OncoMed partial hold

The FDA froze the clinical trial of anti-Fzd7 vantictumab in July over concern about "bone-related adverse events."

Research links estrogen and binge eating

Baylor College of Medicine researchers have found that an estrogen replacement suppressed binge-eating behavior among lab mice.

Apple selfies spur diabetes donations

Jazz apples has launched a Crunch to Contribute campaign to raise money for one of two diabetes associations.