BMS enters two immuno-oncology deals

Share this article:

Bristol-Myers Squibb has deepened its bets on immuno-oncology. The drugmaker announced Tuesday that it is testing its experimental PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab in combination with Incyte's oral dioscygenase-1 inhibitor, INCB24360.

The Phase I/II study will address multiple tumor types, which the companies said in a joint statement may include melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, ovarian cancer and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, among others.

BMS announced in April that it planned to complete its nivolumab rolling submission to the FDA for non-small cell lung cancer at the end of this year.

Tuesday's collaboration news also included Bristol Myers-Squibb's announcement that it was taking up with CytomX Therapeutics to develop “novel therapies against multiple immuno-oncology targets using CytomX's proprietary Probody Platform.” The companies explained in a joint statement that probodies are selectively activated antibodies which can spare healthy tissue.

The includes a $50 million upfront payment to CytomX and gives BMS exclusive rights to develop probodies for up to four oncology targets.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Business Briefs

Email Newsletters

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Business Briefs

Monday Moves: September 15

Hires and promotions for manufacturers, regulatory and agencies

Kantar acquires Evidências, expands Brazilian presence

The company's acquisition signals the growing importance of understanding the Brazilian healthcare market and evidence-based healthcare management services.

Study says statins not enough for diabetic hearts

Researchers using an experimental test have discovered that the 50% of surveyed diabetics may also have undetected heart muscle damage.