Business briefs: Pfizer and CVS; the EMA; Digitas Health New York

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Pfizer announced a website, in partnership with retail pharmacy giant CVS, that will offer home delivery of Viagra for customers ordering online with a valid prescription. Visitors to www.viagra.com/buy-real-viagra, which is being promoted through paid search, are funneled to CVS's National Association of Boards of Pharmacy-accredited site when clicking on “Fill a prescription.” Pfizer said it launched the site to foil counterfeiters.

The European Medicines Agency announced a reorg replacing two units working on medicine for human use with four divisions dedicated to: supporting the R&D phase; medicines evaluation and lifecycle management; procedure management and business data; and inspections and pharmacovigilance. The aim, said EMA, is to better support the scientific work of the EMA committees, share data and meet the needs of stakeholders and partners.

Digitas Health New York has promoted Graham Mills to managing director. Mills, who was previously executive creative director, will head up client relationships as well as creative as the shop presses a push into health and wellness. He will report to Publicis Healthcare Communications Group president Michael du Toit.

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