Cohn & Wolfe launches global firm: GCI Health

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Cohn & Wolfe has launched GCI Health, a global public relations firm. The move follows the merger of WPP agencies Cohn & Wolfe and GCI Group—which retained the Cohn & Wolfe name after the merger— in early July.    

GCI Health's New York City headquarters currently has 60 employees, with roughly 70 others spread across 11 cities in North America and Europe, according to Jill Dosik, president of GCI Health. 
Dosik noted that the agency would also leverage the Cohn & Wolfe network of approximately 50 offices around the world. 

“GCI Health has established strong brand equity in the marketplace, and we wanted to continue building on its reputation,” said Dosik. 

“GCI [Group] is renowned globally for its expertise in handling clients' toughest challenges, and we see a lot of growth potential in an increasingly complex healthcare market,” she said. According to Dosik, the agency is “a leader in communicating high-science concepts; providing digital health solutions; managing difficult challenges in product safety, pricing, marketing practices and litigation; and working at the intersection of marketing and public affairs.” GCI Health's client list is confidential, said Dosik, but the agency represents “some of the largest healthcare companies in the world, including pharmaceutical, biotech, and medical technology companies, hospitals, non-profits, medical providers and others.”

Dosik joined GCI in 1993 after graduating with a Juris Doctor. 
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