Company news: Bristol-Myers Squibb and Regeneron

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Bristol Myers-Squibb is launching yet another round of layoffs, reported Pharmalot, which said the total will be around 100 employees across departments including field sales, medical support and data analytics specialists. Pharmalot said the layoffs will mostly center around the company's Plainsboro, NJ, locations and is on top of last month's announcement that it was slashing 479 jobs, with a particular emphasis among sales reps.

In the complete opposite direction, Regeneron -- maker of macular degeneration med Eylea -- is expanding its headcount by around 300 new positions, according to the Business Review. The hires will be based in East Greenbush, NY, where it is adding 65,000 square feet, which the Business Review reported will be used for clinical trials, commercialization, and office space. In a second-quarter earnings presentation in July, Regeneron management said the drug's launch was progressing well and that the company raised expectations for sales to reach between $700 and $750 million for the year, compared to initial estimates of between $500 and $550 million.
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