Company news: Elsevier and Eli Lilly

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Elsevier said Wednesday that it is the new publisher of The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a division of Wolters Kluwer, has published the monthly journal for the past seven years. Five publishers were in the running for the title, a spokesperson for The American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry  told MM&M, and Elsevier was selected after a period of 18-months in which the publishers were considered. "Elsevier was chosen based on the belief that it was best for the long-term growth of the journal -- especially in the international arena," she said. The journal focuses on the diagnosis and classification of late-life psychiatric disorders, psychopharmacology and other topics.

Eli Lilly said its new Erl Wood facility in Surrey, UK, is officially open. The company invested $87.5 million in the new site, which will provide research space for 130 scientists, reported Nature. The new digs are an addition to the company's neuroscience complex, making it the company's second-largest research site (its US Indianapolis, IN, headquarters ranks first), according to the publication.
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