Company news: GSK, Cadient, AbelsonTaylor

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The FDA approved the restless legs syndrome drug Horizant to treat postherpetic neuralgia in adults. The new indication triggers a $10 million milestone payment from GlaxoSmithKline to Xenoport and promises patients relief from the painful condition, which can follow a shingles infection and last for months or years.

Cadient promoted Will Reese and Bryan Hill. Reese, previously chief innovation officer, is now managing partner. He will oversee strategic consulting and will manage the agency's creative, media and analytics teams. Bryan Hill's new job as chief technology officer will give him a greater role in developing the agency's technology and increasing its mobile and social delivery systems. Both will continue to report to CEO Stephen Wray.

Independent agency AbelsonTaylor has hired a new associate interactive developer, Erik Spitzer, and front-end developer Michael Goodman. Spitzer previously taught iOS and Xbox 360 development at the iD Gaming Academy at Lake Forest College. He will report to Associate Director of Interactive Technology Scott Lutzow. Goodman previously freelanced for Hyperviolet Design and at the marketing agency Viveli. Goodman will report to Chris Klanac, manager of interactive development.
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