Company news: mobile ad budgets continue to grow

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Mobile marketing budgets continue to retain their luster. A report by research firm Emarketer notes that 65% of polled marketers are upping their mobile ad budgets this year. Mobile search ads will pull in almost half of all mobile ad dollars. Marketers also plan to invest in standard mobile banner ads, mobile rich media ads and mobile video ads. A recent Pew Internet report shows that smartphone use is up across all demographics. Pew says 46% of American adults have smartphones, and use grew the most among urban and rural communities over the past year.

Johnson & Johnson's Risperdal marketing headache continues. The company's billion-dollar settlement has been rejected by the Feds who are looking for a larger settlement, reports the Wall Street Journal. This is just the latest in a change of upsets for the company which has seen its CEO Weldon get knocked down a peg and its reputation get repeatedly dinged by product recalls. J&J's Janssen unit was accused of fraudulently marketing its drug Risperdal in Texas. The company cited the litigation as one of its special pre-tax items during the fourth quarter.
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