Company news: smartphones, Janssen, FDA

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A study shows that smartphones are where the purchasing power is. According to research firm Deloitte, almost 50% of smartphone users say their phones helped them choose an item while bricks-and-mortar shopping, and  more than 33% of the users used a smartphone shopping app to help them decide. The fuss: Deloitte says this means smartphones have sealed $159 million in sales in just the first six months of this year, representing about 5.1% of in-store sales. Going forward four years, Deloitte says that number will jump to $689 billion in mobile-influenced sales, or 19% of in-store sales, while the industry estimates that the more linear direct mobile commerce will be $30 billion at that very same time.

Janssen-Cilag GmBH is adding a new heart failure treatment, known as COR-1, to its pipeline with one stroke: by acquiring privately-held Corlmmun for an undisclosed amount. The deal gives Janssen all rights to the drug, which is a small cyclic peptide.

The FDA Safety and Innovation Act is heading to the Oval Office for signature. Although the act is closely associated with user fees, the legislation's other implications include a provision that could speed up access to treatments for rare diseases. The legislation, which the Boston Herald notes was initially proposed as stand-alone legislation by Sen. Kay Hagen (D-NC), allows the FDA to expedite drug review under certain circumstances. There are about 7,000 rare diseases, but only 250 with FDA-approved treatments.
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