DDR on DTC: Myrbetriq

Share this article:
DDR on DTC: Myrbetriq
Myrbetriq’s walking, cute little bladder is an instant icon

Kudos to Astellas and its ­Myrbetriq brand for a DTC campaign that pulls all of DTC's levers. Myrbetriq is another entrant in that DTC mainstay category of overactive bladder (OAB). We've seen a lot of approaches in this “lifestyle” category over the years, including Astellas' own pipe-people. But we've never seen a walking, cute little bladder until now. This little guy is great—an instant icon. He acts like a naughty child—personifying the disease—trying to drag our patient into the restroom at the most inconvenient times.

The :60 commercial reflects a classic problem-solution narrative. Our bad boy bladder is taken to the doctor where we learn about the benefits of Myrbetriq and see a wonderful package shot of the brand. Our little bladder pays close attention, and in the resolution scenes, he is relaxed and not bothering the patient.

I admit that I am a sucker for anthropomorphic characters in ads like the Nasonex Bee, Lamisil's Digger, even the Mucinex Slob. Such characters in or outside of DTC help define brand personality and drive memorability. In this case, the walking bladder works to help educate patients and destigmatize the condition.

The brand website reinforces the user-friendliness/helpfulness seen in the TV ad. Of course, our little bladder is there too. I expect we'll see a lot more of him. After all, it's a competitive category and there's a new kid in town making noise—in all the right ways.


Deborah Dick-Rath is the president of Epic Proportions, a healthcare communications consultancy. She can be reached at deborahdrath@optonline.net

Share this article:
close

Next Article in Features

Email Newsletters

More in Features

Antidote: On Cystic Fibrosis treatments

Antidote: On Cystic Fibrosis treatments

Recent treatments in CF, including the inhaled antibiotic Tobramycin, have increased lifespan well into adulthood.

The $3 generic and the $1,000 pill: pharma outsiders just don't get it

The $3 generic and the $1,000 pill: pharma ...

What do you call the people who treat medical breakthroughs as if they were bank heists? Malicious? Uninformed? Not with it?

Leadership Exchange Uncut : The Agency-Client Relationship

Leadership Exchange Uncut : The Agency-Client Relationship

Click the above link to access MM&M's first Leadership Exchange Uncut e-book, "The Agency-Client Relationship"