DDR on DTC: Vaniqa

Share this article:
DDR on DTC: Vaniqa
DDR on DTC: Vaniqa
Vaniqa is an Rx dermatological cream that reduces “unwanted facial hair” in women. It's a “cosmeceutical” brand that falls somewhere between the dermatologist's office and your local Sephora, and its new DTC campaign is just as confused. We see many happy customers in 60 seconds — all in close-up, too. They may be smiling because they got a $50 rebate, which is prominently displayed a few times.
The ad is very hard working. It uses a clinical tone so we know it's a serious, not frivolous, beauty aid. We see a brief “little science” demo that shows how hair follicle growth is stunted by an enzyme blocker in Vaniqa. And the ad delivers an end-benefit that could apply to any number of personal care products: “the freedom to be close to people.” All in all, it's basically a mini-infomercial, complete with testimonials and offers, but in a 60-second format
Unfortunately, even though a large amount of information is provided, the ad fails to build an emotional connection for the brand. And worse, the call-to-action is fumbled, so we are not sure what to do or where to go for this product. It's too bad the advertising misses an opportunity for Vaniqa to be memorable and wanted by the millions and millions of women who have “unwanted facial hair.” Ouch. My guess is that this is a large female target audience — one that other DTC cosmeceuticals such as Latisse and Oracea have figured out with effective, branded ads that convey both emotion and information.

Deborah Dick-Rath is SVP, healthcare practice leader, at FactorTG. Contact: deborah.dick-rath@factortg.com
Share this article:

Email Newsletters

More in Features

Leadership Exchange: How Do We Get Beyond the Pill?

Leadership Exchange: How Do We Get Beyond the ...

As its focus moves from manufacturing to service, pharma needs to partner with healthcare neophytes as well as established players. James Chase asks six experts to assess the risks and ...

FDA and off-label uses: a balancing act

FDA and off-label uses: a balancing act

FDA's current re-examination of its off-label promotion policies in light of the First Amendment is a delicate balancing act between its rock-solid traditional enforcement posture and a diverse new electronic ...

Read the complete August 2014 Digital Edition

Read the complete August 2014 Digital Edition

Click the above link to access the complete Digital Edition of the August 2014 issue of MM&M, with all text, charts and pictures.