Digital Media briefs: January 2013

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Digital Media briefs: January 2013
Digital Media briefs: January 2013

Durex observed World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, with a social media campaign dubbed #1Share1Condom. The Twitter and Facebook initiative aimed to raise awareness about the need for prevention education to stop the spread of the disease—along with the Reckitt Benckiser rubber brand's profile, of course.

Nurses aren't big on iPads, or tablets as a whole, according to a survey of more than 100 acute care nurses conducted by the consulting group Spyglass, reported MobiHealth News. The study found that the reason behind the nurses' disdain for tablets included durability issues, infection control and limited data entry. Spyglass found that 45% of clinicians use mobiles to collect bedside data, up from 30% last year, and that they're increasingly using camera phones to capture patient data.

A texting-based smoking cessation program along the lines of Text4Baby drove a significant increase in quit rates, according to a study published by the Cochrane Collaboration. Researchers estimated the program “increased the chance of quitting [for] at least six months— from four to five percent in control groups, to between six and 10 percent in the texting groups.”
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