Digital Media briefs: June 2012

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Digital Media briefs: June 2012
Digital Media briefs: June 2012
Sixty-two percent of docs now have tablets, according to Manhattan Research, and half of those physicians have used theirs at point of care. More than two-thirds use video to stay current on clinical info, but adoption of physician-only social networks like Sermo and Doximity was flat between 2011 and 2012.

More than half of moms say social networks influence their opinion of health and ­wellness topics, according to a survey by consultancy Enspektos, and four in ten moms who own smartphones have used them to download mobile health apps from iTunes and other places.

Everyday Health, the web portal, was nominated for a daytime Emmy for Everyday Health, the syndicated TV series. The show, with inspiring stories of people who've surmounted health crises, airs Saturday mornings on ABC affiliates. ­Everyday Health produces it with TV distributor Litton Entertainment and indie production company Trium.

One app to bind them all? A developer called Happtique has come up with mRx, a program designed to make it easy for docs to refer patients to medical apps for fitness, adherence or monitoring.
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