Digitas Health hangs shingle in London, Boston

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Digitas Health is opening offices in London and Boston to accommodate several years' worth of strong growth, the Publicis network said.

The London office will serve the international needs of current clients and will be headed by June Dawson, who becomes SVP, managing director. Dawson previously headed digital business at the London office of Ogilvy Healthworld.

The Boston office, housed within the Boston headquarters of parent company Digitas, will aim to pull talent from Digitas' non-pharma consumer-facing accounts into the health space. Digitas Health Boston will be led by Kirk Williamson, SVP marketing, and Michael Tiedemann, SVP creative. Williamson's consumer and healthcare marketing experience includes stints with Gillette/P&G, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Frito-Lay. Tiedemann is moving over from Digitas proper, where he spent a decade heading CRM creative for top automotive and financial services industries and headed creative for Digitas' Prodigious digital productions company.

"There aren't any silos between Digitas and Digitas Health," said Williamson of the Boston office. "We have a rich digital pedigree in Boston."

Digitas Health has seen around 50% annual revenue growth for each of the past three years and has won 14 new client brands over the past year. The network is MM&M's 2009 Agency of the Year.
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