Doctors say vaccines don't pay

Share this article:

Ten percent of surveyed doctors told the Centers for Disease Control that they may no longer provide vaccines. Reuters reports that the CDC's half-full point of view is that at least the number has not gone up: 10% of polled doctors told the CDC the very same thing in 2007.

The reason for the physicians' discontent is a financial one. Doctors pay for the drugs up front, for which they get money back, and then get paid to give the drugs to patients. The amount doctors receive for patient visits varies. Reuters reports Medicaid pays $9.45 for administering vaccines (in addition to reimbursement for the vaccine itself), and private insurers can pay around $16.62, although clinicians can sometimes negotiate for more from private payers.

Reuters says vaccines from age 0 through 18 cost around $2,500 over 35 visits.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Business Briefs

Email Newsletters

MM&M Future Leaders


Register now

Early bird $1,950 before 31 October 2014

*Group discounts available on request 

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Business Briefs

Monday Moves: September 15

Hires and promotions for manufacturers, regulatory and agencies

Kantar acquires Evidências, expands Brazilian presence

The company's acquisition signals the growing importance of understanding the Brazilian healthcare market and evidence-based healthcare management services.

Study says statins not enough for diabetic hearts

Researchers using an experimental test have discovered that the 50% of surveyed diabetics may also have undetected heart muscle damage.