DTC spend declined in third quarter

Share this article:

Could DTC be going the way of detailing?

DTC spending declined 7.1% in the third quarter—the first decline in recent memory—to $1.125 billion as companies pruned print, radio and network TV advertising, according to Nielsen Media Research data.

While network TV ad spend dipped for the quarter, year-on-year—from $332 million to $304 million—spending on cable TV rose, from $275 million to $288 million, as did spending on syndicated, spot and Spanish language TV. National magazine ad spend slid from $330 million to $300 million, while national Sunday supplement spend dropped from $36 million to $18 million and local newspaper spend plummeted from $2 million to $725,817. Network radio spend skidded from $6.3 million to $3.5 million, and spot radio spend went from $6.6 million to just over $1 million.

Spend on AstraZeneca's Crestor dropped from $43 million for Q3 2006 to $4 million for Q3 2007, while Nexium spend went from $43 million to $17 million. Pfizer's support for Lipitor slipped from $31 million to $23 million, and Relpax went from $18 million to nothing. The sleep category saw incremental increases in spend, with exception to Takeda's Rozerem, which ratcheted down from $58 million to $32 million. Novartis dropped support for Lamisil and Zelnorm, which together accounted for $60 million in Q3 spend in 2006. Similarly, GlaxoSmith-

Kline dropped support for Imitrex and Coreg, for which it laid out $44 million combined in Q3 2006. Lilly trimmed Cymbalta's sails from $39 million for Q3 2006 to $26 million in 2007.

Those declines were offset by launch campaigns and heightened spend on drugs like Cialis, Abilify, Nasonex and Plavix.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Pharmaceutical


Does a health psychology approach hold the key to Rx adherence? In MM&M's latest Leadership Exchange Uncut eBook, industry stakeholders from the payer, provider, academic and pharma realms explore the "why" behind medicine taking. Access here.