Diabetes giant lands PI-CME grants

Big Data is powering Joslin Diabetes Center's performance-improvement CME, thanks in part to education grants from four pharma companies.

The four—Sanofi, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline and Eli Lilly—are supporting a project in which Joslin, the Harvard affiliate, will take a fresh approach to building the evidence base driving PI-CME.

“PI-CME is a good concept, but it's too cumbersome for the way the system works right now,” says Julie Brown, CCMEP, Joslin director of professional education. “Even if you spend a lot of time helping one practice [via chart abstracts, etc.], it's not scalable or reflective of actual day-to-day care.”

The way to make it so, she says, is by plugging into longitudinal data. Enter Humedica, which will give Joslin researchers access to a de-identified, population health data set (its database includes patient notes via natural-language translation). Humedica will also coordinate with its existing partner American Medical Group Association to engage primary care providers.

Joslin will evaluate practice patterns of people with T2D and their outcomes, then take the next step: providing professional education in whatever area is needed.

The longitudinal approach is designed to help CME become more than an episodic, one-time effort. Says Brown, “We really want to work toward integrating CME into the day-to-day practice, not something [physicians] go get and forget about.”
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