Providers must clarify incorrect info

Accredited providers will be responsible for offering corrective information to learners, faculty and planners if an activity is found to break rules for independence, freedom from commercial bias or content validation, ACCME said.
Providers will determine how to communicate the information and are under no obligation to say that they are doing so because the activity was found noncompliant. Nor will learner credits be revoked.
“The idea is not to make the learners further victim of biased information,” Dr. Murray Kopelow, ACCME chief executive, told MM&M. Besides, he pointed out, the AMA PRA Category 1 credit system is the sole purview of the American Medical Association.
Providers must also issue a corrective statement to the ACCME, including a report of the information transmitted.
The policy change was adopted at the council's November 2010 board meeting and will be implemented going forward, following internal review and a public comment period that ended in September.
It's the second refinement ACCME has made this year to the Complaints and Inquiries process, which it uses to investigate criticisms lodged against activities. In July, the council decided, based on stakeholder feedback, that accredited med ed providers who break the rules should not be identified, unless changes in their accreditation status occur. The community had voted overwhelmingly in favor of discretion during the adjudication process.
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Features

Email Newsletters


Investment in healthcare IT stands at an all-time high. The government has spent billions to promote EHR adoption. Yet the physician wish list is a mile long, while hospitals and patients are not where they need to be. To peel back the layers of what we've all been waiting for in the Great Data Capture of the 21st Century, and to review the changes enabling the healthcare data ecosystem to coexist, MM&M presents this e-Book. Click here.


What does going "beyond the pill" actually mean? At MM&M's recent inaugural spring conference, audience members heard from real-world companies that are managing the organizational, technological, and promotional challenges inherent in this transition, such as partnering with health neophytes, harnessing technologies that allow deeper engagement with patients, and adopting a new commercial mindset to serve, not sell. Download here.