Google's health initiative expected to launch in '08

Share this article:
Google is expected to launch its eagerly awaited health initiative sometime in early 2008, according to the company's head of search, Marissa Mayer.

During October's Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco, Mayer gave a brief outline of how Google is planning to leverage its search and data storage capacities in the areas of medical care and patient records.

“Google is not a doctor, but people come to us with a lot of health information searches.  There is a big user information need, which we should ultimately fill,” Mayer said.

She told the audience to “expect a lot of activity in the coming months.”

Earlier in October, Microsoft beat Google to the punch, making the leap into the online consumer healthcare space by offering free personal health records on the Web.

The service called HealthVault will offer consumers personal health records and an Internet search engine tailored for health.

“The value of what we're doing will go up rapidly as we get more partners,” Peter Neupert, the vice president in charge of Microsoft's health group, told The New York Times.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Features

Email Newsletters

MM&M Future Leaders


Register now

Early bird $1,950 before 31 October 2014

*Group discounts available on request 

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Features

Read the complete October 2014 Digital Edition

Read the complete October 2014 Digital Edition

Click the above link to access the complete Digital Edition of the October 2014 issue of MM&M, with all text, charts and pictures.

Predicting your pink slip

Predicting your pink slip

Any time a firm needs to save money, high-salaried executives are targets