Gottlieb goes to Weisscom Partners

Share this article:

Cohn & Wolfe healthcare head Jennifer Gottlieb has jumped ship to bicoastal boutique Weisscom Partners.

Gottlieb, who was EVP and managing director of the PR firm's New York healthcare practice, becomes managing director and head of East Coast operations at Weisscom, which handles Genentech's oncology franchise as well as several GlaxoSmith-Kline accounts.

After nine years at Cohn & Wolfe, Gottlieb said, “It was going to take a very unique and different opportunity to get me to leave. Weiscomm is a growing operation, and it's something I haven't done.”

With offices in New York and San Francisco, Weisscom, which handles product and corporate communications and investor relations, boasts a staff of 30. 

Weisscom principals Jim Weiss and Dianne Weisler worked with Gottlieb in her days at Makovsky in the 1990s, when Weisler was a colleague and Weiss was a client with RPR, later absorbed into Aventis.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Features

Email Newsletters

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Features

Read the complete September 2014 Digital Edition

Read the complete September 2014 Digital Edition

Click the above link to access the complete Digital Edition of the August 2014 issue of MM&M, with all text, charts and pictures.

Medical marketing needs mainstream Mad Men

Medical marketing needs mainstream Mad Men

Agencies must generate emotional resonance with the target audience, not unlike Apple, Pepsi or Nike

Are discounts cutting out co-pays?

GSK's decision to cut Advair's price spurred some PBMs to put it back on formulary. Will drugmaker discounts diminish the need for loyalty programs? How can these programs stay relevant beyond giving co-pay assistance?