GSK launches puckish $15m "Sucks less" effort for Nicorette

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GSK launches puckish $15m "Sucks less" effort for Nicorette
GSK launches puckish $15m "Sucks less" effort for Nicorette
GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare is taking an irreverent tone with its latest ads for Nicorette, featuring the tagline “Makes Quitting Suck Less.”

The $15 million campaign, by TBWA\Chiat\Day, is set to run through April and includes network TV and radio ads, along with an “Open letter to smokers” running in national mags and newspapers and on the brand's Facebook fan page.”

One broadcast spot depicts a driver stuck in traffic, his office carpool in the back seat. When he spies another driver smoking, a “Suckometer” perched in the passenger seat starts chirping, its needle moving toward the measure “Sucks more.” After he pops a tab of Nicorette, of course, the bleeping subsides and the needle goes back to “Sucks less.”

The campaign aims to connect with smokers by adopting the language they use to describe quitting, the company said.

“In order to truly connect with smokers, we realized that we needed to change how we speak to them about quitting,” said TBWA\Chiat\Day creative chief Mark Figliulo in a statement. “The campaign is designed to engage smokers in an honest way by reaching them with a message that shows the brand understands what they are going through, and that Nicorette is on their side.”

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