ImpactRx's TabletImpact shows reps tablet's strengths

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ImpactRx, a firm that measures the impact of promotional materials on physician prescribing behavior, has launched TabletImpact, an analytical tool for pharma sales representatives. The tool lets reps gauge the execution and effectiveness of a tablet-centric marketing campaign.

The company's consulting analytics division devised TabletImpact as a way to help clients tactically adjust their strategies,  optimizing the impact of the tablet on the HCP audience, says Brian Gibbs, ImpactRx's vice president, consulting analytics.

"Not only can we measure the overall impact of a tablet-delivered detail, but we are also able to drill down into the components of the detail to determine which messages are more effectively delivered with the tablet,” explains Gibbs.

Combining use of the company's ImpactData asset with its TabletImpact tool has led to a “dramatic increase” in the use of the tablet across an aggressive e-detailing landscape, according to ImpactRx's president and CEO, Greg Ellis, who calls the product a “best-in-class analytical solution.”

“Considering the substantial investment our clients have made in this technology, it is vital that its impact on physician prescribing behavior be effectively analyzed and evaluated,” Ellis adds.
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