InVivo appoints Perrin as new CEO

Share this article:

InVivo Therapeutics announced the appointment of Mark D. Perrin as CEO, effective Jan. 6. Perrin, who will also assume a spot on the company's Board of Directors, succeeds interim CEO Michael Astrue, who has served in that position since the resignation of Francis Reynolds for medical reasons in August.

Most recently serving as the president of biotech consulting firm Dennen Consulting, Perrin has held the positions of president and CEO at ConjuChem Biotechnologies, as well as EVP and chief commercial officer for Orphan Medical. His professional history also includes stints heading up US commercial operations at both Burroughs Wellcome and Lederle Laboratories.

"Mark is an excellent fit for InVivo," said company chairman John McCarthy. "His extensive commercial background will be invaluable."

McCarthy also noted that Perrin's "solid experience raising money" will be important to the company as it continues to focus its resources on "high-value opportunities that maximize long-term value."

McCarthy also praised Astrue's accomplishments, noting that his initiatives "greatly improved management of the company."

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Business Briefs

Email Newsletters

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Business Briefs

Monday Moves: September 15

Hires and promotions for manufacturers, regulatory and agencies

Kantar acquires Evidências, expands Brazilian presence

The company's acquisition signals the growing importance of understanding the Brazilian healthcare market and evidence-based healthcare management services.

Study says statins not enough for diabetic hearts

Researchers using an experimental test have discovered that the 50% of surveyed diabetics may also have undetected heart muscle damage.