Lilly to disclose non-cash transfers

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Eli Lilly debuted an expanded doctor-payment report, adding food, travel and other non-cash gifts given to doctors and healthcare groups.

According to its latest quarterly report, required by a corporate integrity agreement, the firm ponied up $48.1 million, most of it for research and other payments. 

Since 2009 Lilly has been detailing fees paid to its own 4,000-5,000-strong clinician faculty for commercial speaking, spokesman J. Scott MacGregor told MM&M. Those programs totaled $13.6 million this time, or 28% of the total.

The registry also includes payments to any physician who received a transfer of value (TOV), such as meals and travel expenses, each accounting for 4% of the drugmaker's outlay to professionals during the quarter.

Another $30.4 million (63%) went to hospitals or universities to cover costs associated with running clinical trials. 

In 2013, all companies will have to make TOV disclosures for payments made in 2012 under the Affordable Care Act's sunshine provision. CMS pledged to issue an initial round of sunshine regulation this year. 

Currently the law lists 14 natures of payment and TOVs that drug and device makers need to record. Except for samples, everything from food and entertainment to gifts, consulting fees and honoraria are included.

Pfizer has also begun quantifying payments on research and TOVs.




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