Lysteda TV ads make some networks squeamish

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Lysteda TV ads make some networks squeamish
Lysteda TV ads make some networks squeamish
Ferring Pharmaceuticals is launching its first branded TV ad with spots for its Lysteda treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

The ad's up-front discussion of the condition, featuring the tagline “Help for heavy periods,” put network execs off,  with some initially refusing to air it. The spot depicts women walking serenely through falling rose petals to visualize the product's benefits.

“Periods are a natural part of a woman's life,” says the voiceover. “But what if your periods are unusually heavy? That may be a medical condition called heavy monthly bleeding.” Up to 22 million American women suffer from heavy monthly bleeding, according to Ferring.

The ad casts Lysteda as an alternative to hormones or surgery, “the first and only pill to help reduce heavy monthly bleeding by about one third.” It's part of an integrated campaign including print and branded and unbranded online elements.

The ads were spearheaded by Ferring VP US marketing Bill Garbarini and product manager Cicek Tilley. Creative concepts for the spots were developed by Integrated Media Solutions and DePirro/Garrone. The campaign is being executed by Integrated Communications Corp., Westfield Group Medical Communications and Kovak-Likely Communications.

Lysteda (tranexamic acid) won FDA approval as the first non-hormonal product for treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding in November, 2009, and Ferring acquired the drug from Xanodyne Pharmaceuticals in May.
 
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