M3 Group extends reach in Iberian and Latin American markets with partnership

Share this article:
Aki Tomaru
Aki Tomaru

MDLinx owner M3 Group is partnering with Argentine online CME firm Medcenter on a content-sharing deal that will expand its in-language reach to Spain, Portugal and Latin America.

Medcenter will join M3's Networks in Health, an “international alliance of online physician communities that provides pharmaceutical, medical device and other healthcare companies services for reaching and engaging doctors across Europe, the Americas and Asia.”

“We're trying to be global,” said Aki Tomaru, CEO of M3 USA. Tomaru said that while M3's Doctors.net.uk runs pan-European campaigns, pharmas are increasingly shopping for broader buys that hopscotch across global markets.

“They want to cherry-pick the countries,” said Tomaru. Until now, he added, that meant either partnering with a different in-culture shop in each country or distributing their content in English through WebMD's Medscape (with which Medcenter had a previous affiliation). “The willingness of most physicians in non-English-speaking countries to spend time on English language materials is limited,” said Tomaru.

Medcenter boasts a network of 480,000 physicians. M3, a Sony-owned Japanese conglomerate whose portfolio includes M3.com in Japan, US-based MDLinx and UK-based Doctors.net.uk, claims more than a million physician members worldwide.
Share this article:

Email Newsletters

More in News

Star Group merges with Vox Medica, Calcium NYC

Star Group merges with Vox Medica, Calcium NYC

The newly formed group will be known as Calcium with Steve Michaelson, formerly of Rosetta Wishbone, at the helm.

Survey finds pay doesn't make doctors happy

Survey finds pay doesn't make doctors happy

Medscape's survey of over 24,000 physicians found that a paycheck is not necessarily linked to a physician's professional satisfaction.

CDC sees declines in some diabetes complications

CDC sees declines in some diabetes complications

Centers for Disease Control data shows that diabetes complications including heart attack and amputation fell in the twenty years between 1990 and 2010. The bad news: the number of diagnosed ...