Mobile is key to communicating info, Google finds

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Brian Schmidt
Brian Schmidt

The data surrounding the importance of mobile continues to pile up. Marketing research firm USamp found that 12% of the women polled shop while in a doctor's waiting room and 25% of men dabble in mobile shopping during the 9-to-5 hours.

Google's September ThinkHealth conference provided more insight about what patients and physicians are looking for, and ignoring, in the webified healthcare space. The quick takeaway, according to Brian Schmidt, Google's director of healthcare services: mobile and search are the keys to getting information across.

“Mobile growth has exploded,” Schmidt told MM&M, and  Google's data show that mobile search is being used more comprehensively than before. Among its findings: 61% of surveyed patients visited more than two hospital sites before booking an appointment, 77% relied on search results before booking appointments, 21% book using computers or mobile devices and, of particular interest: patients typically begin searches with general terms and close out with branded ones.

Doctors are also digging deep—69% told Google that they rely on search engines when looking for information when using smart phones, but 74% rely on search engines when hunting around for information on their tablets.

“If you look at our search data, the complexity of search terms continues to increase,” Schmidt told MM&M. “The opportunity to have a deeper conversation with customers exists and you can really react to what somebody is searching for,”
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