MPR hits the quarter-century mark

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Monthly Prescribing Reference (MPR) covered three new drugs for its inaugural issue, in June 1985. A quarter century and 906 new product editorials later, MPR is celebrating its 25th anniversary.   

Technology has been a key element in the publication's longevity, but MPR's most fundamental strength lies in its utility, said Lee Maniscalco, CEO at Haymarket Medical. “People rely on [MPR] because it's used, not read. They go to it for solutions.”

The concept for MPR, which offers concise editorial monographs (written by pharmacists) on new drugs, originated from MIMS, a similar drug reference title published in the UK, according to Mark Bugni, president and CEO of Prescribing Reference, Inc., a division of Haymarket Medical. In 1984, Haymarket execs Lindsay Masters and Simon Tindall brought the idea to the US, said Bugni, and were greeted with enthusiasm by pharma companies, agencies and even FDA personnel.

With Jerry Bernstein, MPR's first pharmacist editor, the publication developed its signature editorial style, tapping freelance pharmacists for content. One year later, MPR was being used by 40% of the US primary care audience, said Bugni, citing a FOCUS research study. The publication recognized the importance of third-party research early on, said Bugni. “Advertisers wanted to know how many times a doctor referred to the antihypertensive or migraine sections” to assess ad exposure, said Bugni.

Though the print issue still goes out each month, Jim Pantaleo, VP, publisher at MPR, said drug info has to reach physicians “in any form they need it, whenever and wherever, and that can be print, desktop, web or handheld.” MPR's format remains intact, and that is what users seek out, said Pantaleo. MPR is published by Haymarket Medical, a subsidiary of Haymarket Media, publisher of MM&M.
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