Nature pulls GSK paper

Share this article:

Nature has officially dumped a 2010 research article about a then-experimental MS medication via retraction, reports BioCentury. The retracted paper came under scrutiny earlier this year, after GlaxoSmithKline fired its research head in China, Jiangwu Zang, upon “discovering that a study...contained misrepresentation of data,” according to Reuters which covered the firing in June.

The employee dismissal was soon followed by coverage in which Liu Xuebin, one of the other dismissed researchers, told Bloomberg in August that GSK created a high-stress, competitive environment in which mistakes can happen and corners cut. He also said that the MS study, which labeled healthy MS cells as from healthy subjects, should not be thrown out.

GSK said in a statement Dec. 5 that it investigated the matter and recommended Nature retract the paper. The company said in the statement that it “still believes the investigational drug and the signaling pathway may have potential in other disease states,” but that it is no longer exploring the MS application. GSK said a total of five R&D employees associated with the paper (which had 18 authors) are no longer with the company.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Business Briefs

Email Newsletters

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Business Briefs

Monday Moves: September 15

Hires and promotions for manufacturers, regulatory and agencies

Kantar acquires Evidências, expands Brazilian presence

The company's acquisition signals the growing importance of understanding the Brazilian healthcare market and evidence-based healthcare management services.

Study says statins not enough for diabetic hearts

Researchers using an experimental test have discovered that the 50% of surveyed diabetics may also have undetected heart muscle damage.