New firm foregoes industry funding

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Lighthouse Learning is offering to produce CME content that is free of commercial support.

Started by a Harvard neurologist and two executives, the firm will exclusively license its content nationwide to medical societies, insurers and meetings companies.

“In the big picture, any steps that CME providers can take to alter the perception of commercial bias in CME will serve us all well,” Jon Leibowitz, president and CEO of the new organization, told MM&M.

Its funding model is not new, though, said Dr. Murray Kopelow, executive director of the Accreditation Council for CME: 943—or 42% of the 2,225 ACCME-accredited providers submitting data for the 2009 ACCME annual data report—took no commercial support for their educational programs. It's not known whether any of them operate on a national scale, as Lighthouse intends to do.

Lighthouse is aiming for provisional ACCME accreditation by next year and hopes to conduct activities in 2011 with another organization serving as joint sponsor.
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