Pfizer, CDM clean up at Doctors' Choice

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Professional ads for Pfizer's Chantix and Organon's NuvaRing were the year's top-rated as judged by physicians in the Association of Medical Media's fifth annual Doctors' Choice Awards.

The two-page Chantix ad, executed by Euro RSCG Life LM&P, was the top-scoring professional ad in the general practice category, while the one-page NuvaRing ad, by CommonHealth's Adient, took top honors in the specialty category.

The survey, which drew responses from 6,040 physicians, included 332 professional ads in 11 therapeutic categories among the 200 most widely advertised products for 2006.

Pfizer was the year's big winner with a total of five awards— for top scoring one- and two-page ads as well as the highest-ranked ads within the cardiovascular and anti-infective categories. Genentech/OSI, Merck and Organon each took home two awards.

On the agency side, Cline Davis & Mann was tops with four awards—three for Pfizer and one for Novo Nordisk's Novolog Flexpen—while AbelsonTaylor, Euro RSCG Life LM&P and CommonHealth's Adient each won two, respectively.

The awards were presented at a September 20 luncheon held at the New York Palace hotel in New York City.

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