P&G, Somaxon deploy reps for Silenor

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Proctor & Gamble and Somaxon Pharmaceuticals have deployed 215 reps in support of Silenor, a newly approved sleep aid indicated for sleep maintenance. E-detailing programs will also launch this quarter.

Jeffrey Raser, SVP and chief commercial officer of Somaxon, said in an email that P&G reps will focus on primary care and high-prescribing physicians, while Somaxon reps will focus on specialists—including psychiatrists, neurologists and  sleep disorder specialists—and high-prescribing primary care physicians.

Additionally, Somoxon tapped Publicis Selling Solutions (PSS) for contract sales support, and hired 10 regional sales managers to work directly with PSS reps, according to Raser. PSS reps will only sell Silenor, he said. RevHealth is the AOR for Silenor, and Ignite Health is handling its online activities.

Combined sales forces are expected to reach 35,000 physicians and 25,000 pharmacies, according to a company statement, and e-detailing programs will target physicians not called on directly by reps.

Unlike Ambien and Ambien CR, Silenor is indicated for sleep maintenance (staying asleep) and not sleep onset (going to sleep initially); Ambien and Ambien CR are indicated for both. However, other prescription sleep aids, including Ambien and Lunesta, are scheduled drugs, whereas Silenor was not deemed a controlled substance by FDA. Silenor marketers hope to leverage that distinction with doctors and patients.
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