Pharma Report 2012: Get Back in Shape

Share this article:
Pharma Report 2012: Get Back in Shape
Pharma Report 2012: Get Back in Shape


2    AstraZeneca    $19.9B    up 2.1%
Global revenue: $33.6B (9th); up 0.9%

R&D spend: $5.0B (8th), up 19%; 14.9% of rev.

Top brands: Seroquel IR ($3.3B); Crestor ($3.1B); Nexium ($2.4B); Symbicort ($846M)

Planned launches: Fostamatinib (arth.): NKTR-118 (constipation)

Promotional spend: $1.3B (4th); 6.9% of rev.

Patent expirations: Seroquel IR (2012); Nexium (2014); Symbicort (2015); Crestor (2016)

AstraZeneca faces one of the steepest revenue declines of the pharma majors. Combined with a pipeline analysts consider anemic at best, analysts talk about an acquisition as being a necessary lifeboat for the firm. Most recently, AZ abandoned its depression medication known as TC-5214 after the compound missed its Phase III primary endpoint. A back-and-forth patent drama over anti-psychotic Seroquel, whose IR form goes off patent later this year, yielded a bit of good news: a US judge asserted that the extended-release version would remain covered until 2017 (although the UK High Court declared that Seroquel XR no longer had protection). The company's present outlook is one of hunkering down: besides multiple waves of job cuts, the firm shuttered at least one R&D location. Its fourth-quarter 2011 earnings call was an unvarnished one: CEO David Brennan acknowledged the pipeline is under­performing, while CFO Simon Lowth said significant revenue declines are in store.

Back to first page

Page 2 of 21
Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.

Email Newsletters

More in Features

Read the complete September 2014 Digital Edition

Read the complete September 2014 Digital Edition

Click the above link to access the complete Digital Edition of the August 2014 issue of MM&M, with all text, charts and pictures.

Medical marketing needs mainstream Mad Men

Medical marketing needs mainstream Mad Men

Agencies must generate emotional resonance with the target audience, not unlike Apple, Pepsi or Nike

Are discounts cutting out co-pays?

GSK's decision to cut Advair's price spurred some PBMs to put it back on formulary. Will drugmaker discounts diminish the need for loyalty programs? How can these programs stay relevant beyond giving co-pay assistance?