Policy

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, November 28, 2016

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, November 28, 2016

By

J&J in talks to buy Actelion; Novo Nordisk pulls ads on Breitbart News; Takeda to market Ninlaro in Europe

What's Next for the FDA During the Trump Administration

What's Next for the FDA During the Trump Administration

By

Expect major changes in the way the FDA does business with drug companies after the Trump administration takes over in January.

5 questions raised at the FDA's off-label hearing

5 questions raised at the FDA's off-label hearing

By

The FDA asked questions about the risks and benefits of allowing off-label communications.

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, November 7, 2016

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, November 7, 2016

By

Bayer submits Stivarga to FDA for liver-cancer indication; emails show FDA's divisiveness over Duchenne drug approval; insurers want new president to address ACA financial risks

Timeline of a crisis: How Mylan responded to the EpiPen controversy

Timeline of a crisis: How Mylan responded to the EpiPen controversy

By

Mylan was slammed by people unable to afford its lifesaving EpiPen injection device following a price hike — its response was seen as too little, too late.

Drug Pricing Will Be a Key Issue, Whether Clinton or Trump Win the Election

Drug Pricing Will Be a Key Issue, Whether Clinton or Trump Win the Election

Policymakers respond to a crisis and every crisis has to have a villain. Unfortunately, today pharma is the villain.

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Wednesday, September 7, 2016

By

BIO launches ad campaign defending drugmakers; GSK's experimental COPD drug reduces flare-ups in patients; NY attorney general to investigate Mylan

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Tuesday, August 30, 2016

By

Walgreens Boots partners with PBM; Clinton proposes mental health plan; BI and Qualcomm to develop connected inhaler

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Wednesday, August 10, 2016

By

A new bill exempting CME reporting gains physician support; NYT op-ed calls Opdivo DTC ad "misleading;" Valeant to sell non-core assets worth $8 billion

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Tuesday, July 26, 2016

By

Sales of Gilead's HCV drugs fall; the DNC policy platform criticized price gouging; Janssen partners with Bristol-Myers Squibb on Opdivo combo drug

Clinton or Trump? Either Way, Change Is Coming

Clinton or Trump? Either Way, Change Is Coming

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton offer clear contrasts on the issues of the Affordable Care Act, entitlement reform, and drug pricing.

DTC Report 2016: Gut Check

DTC Report 2016: Gut Check

By

DTC is facing a new test from physicians and politicians. Here's why critics fear a deluge, and how they're pushing back.

Pharma CEOs defend R&D model to investors

Pharma CEOs defend R&D model to investors

By

Executives at Eli Lilly, Merck and Biogen used the most recent earnings season to promote innovation and defend drug pricing.

Must biosimilar names be distinct? No, experts argue

Must biosimilar names be distinct? No, experts argue

Innovator companies want the FDA to adopt separate names for biosimilars. Manufacturing changes aren't drastic enough to make it necessary, experts argued at an FTC workshop.

Docs haven't mellowed on DTC, snap poll suggests

Docs haven't mellowed on DTC, snap poll suggests

By

The FDA wants to know how physician attitudes towards direct-to-consumer advertising have evolved since the agency last asked them, in 2002. If a snap poll by CMI/Compas is any indication, drug companies probably won't like the answers.

Q&A: BIO's Jim Greenwood

Q&A: BIO's Jim Greenwood

By

BIO chief Jim Greenwood talks policy priorities and previews the group's International Convention, now underway in Chicago.

Obama budget would bleed pharmas

By

The White House released its proposed budget for the 2014 fiscal year this morning, and while it gives a modest boost to Health and Human Services, it also seeks to extract more cost savings from pharmas.

For Obama's head-less CMS, third time's the charm

For Obama's head-less CMS, third time's the charm

By

Acting administrator Marilyn Tavenner seems on track for confirmation, with the blessings of all industry stakeholders

Court could punt "Pay for Delay" back to Congress

By

Eight members of the Supreme Court heard testimony in the case of FTC v. Actavis this morning, and the fate of so-called "pay for delay" settlements hangs in the balance.

Senate vote puts ACA's device tax in doubt

Senate vote puts ACA's device tax in doubt

By

In a big win for the device industry, Senators voted overwhelmingly on a symbolic— but politically potent—motion to scrap the 2.3% device excise tax.

Congress loses a healthcare mover, and pharma an unlikely ally on IPAB

Congress loses a healthcare mover, and pharma an unlikely ally on IPAB

By

The November elections were arguably the most important for healthcare policy in 40 years, cementing, as they did, the Affordable Care Act by awarding President Obama a second term. But with all eyes glued to the drama at the top of the ticket, many missed a major Congressional upset that could have big implications for healthcare policy.

The year ahead: A Capitol bit of crystal ball-gazing

From FDA and pharma, to Caronia and off-label communication, three healthcare policy experts offer their take on what 2013 holds in store.

Full steam ahead for Obamacare, but gridlock isn't going anywhere

Full steam ahead for Obamacare, but gridlock isn't going anywhere

By

President Obama has cemented his greatest legislative achievement, the Affordable Care Act, but the status quo should prove anything but boring, with implementation of the law sure to mean more political fireworks

Voting with their wallets, pharmas say no thanks to change

Voting with their wallets, pharmas say no thanks to change

By

Barack Obama edged Mitt Romney in fundraising from pharmas in the 2012 election, even as the industry favored Republicans in other contests. Were change-weary drug companies voting for the status quo?

Docs' presidential preferences follow practice type

Docs' presidential preferences follow practice type

By

Solo practitioners favor Mitt Romney over Barack Obama by a two-to-one ratio, a survey finds, suggesting that changes in reimbursement driven by Obamacare are driving physicians' presidential preferences.

Sunshine Act could scare docs away from commercially-supported CME

Sunshine Act could scare docs away from commercially-supported CME

By

Physicians are reconsidering their participation in industry-sponsored CME, fearful that their inclusion in Sunshine Act databases as having received payments from companies will tarnish their reputations and fuel perceptions of conflicts of interest, a survey has found.

HHS expands 9/11 health program to cover cancers

By

The Department of Health and Human Services observed the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks by extending coverage of a program for first responders sickened by their work at Ground Zero, the Pentagon and the Flight 93 crash site in Shanksville, PA to cover some 50 cancers.

Amid misspent billions, the promise of personalized medicine

By

The Institute of Medicine has released a report putting the cost of unnecessary medical care at $750 billion a year and counting. What does it mean for pharmas? Depends on how you read it.

Healthcare takes center stage at political conventions

Healthcare takes center stage at political conventions

By

Healthcare policy is having its day in the spotlight of presidential politics as Republicans and Democrats rekindle their sparring over the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid.

Stryker layoffs blamed on Obamacare tax

By

No sector of the healthcare industry is rooting harder for the Supreme Court to overturn the Affordable Care Act completely tomorrow than are medical device companies, which are bracing themselves for a substantial excise tax on their revenues that takes effect next year under the law.

OPINION

Email Newsletters