Private View: Breaking the Healthcare Barriers

Share this article:
Dina Peck is a Managing Partner and the Executive Creative Director of  CDMiConnect.
Dina Peck is a Managing Partner and the Executive Creative Director of CDMiConnect.
In marketing, we are in the know, think, do business. Take the example of Honey Nut Cheerios. They let parents know that Honey Nut Cheerios is sweet and heart-healthy. By knowing this, we think, “Wow, I can feel good about buying these for myself, even my kids.” What do parents do? Buy the cereal for themselves and their little tikes.
When we create great work that moves our customers through this mental continuum, we can expect results.

I want to share some consumer work that I think creatively breaks the healthcare barriers and, most importantly, drives customers to act.

Albert Einstein Hospital, Blood Donation
Agency: Z+, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Wouldn't it be nice if anyone who needed blood could get it anytime? Based on this theory, Albert Einstein Hospital placed blood bags in refrigerators in some convenience stores. Customers' reactions were filmed, and turned into a viral and out-of-home campaign. The viral campaign makes you vividly experience the know and think.  Just seeing the video made me act and go give blood! Check this out.

PediaSure
Agency: AbelsonTaylor
This campaign reminds people that they are what they eat. But visually is where the adage becomes fun and clutter-busting. It has consumers think, “Do I really want my kid eventually looking like a donut?” Will people act? My guess is this campaign has people rethinking what their kids  eat. While I like the idea, I wonder if the campaign is getting results, or just doing a great job selling the food ­pyramid. Perhaps both.

Olla Condoms: ­Unexpected Babies
Agency: AgeIsobar, Sao Paulo, Brazil
This social campaign woke up teens on Facebook by sending them friend requests from a baby that is their namesake. It let them know, you need to be smart now and use condoms. It had teens thinking, “This really could be my kid if I don't use one.” My bet is it really had teens in Brazil using more protection. Check out the video case.

Pepto Bismol
Agency: Publicis New York
What a great job of letting folks know that for food-induced heartburn, Pepto works. Consumers then think, “I will be fine if I eat a triple quarter-pounder with extra bacon as long as I have my Pepto.” I think this campaign practically gives people permission to do so. So what do consumers do? They go out and get both!


FluMist
Agency: Digitas
Through memorable creative, we know there's an intransasal alternative to the flu vaccine. The creative makes us think it's easy and pain-free. I can imagine many more making the request. This year, when my youngest daughter cried going to get her flu vaccine, what did I do? I said, “Don't worry, ‘just pick your nose.'” 

PRIVATE VIEW: Each month, a creative director from the industry reviews a number of medical advertisements. Please note that the views expressed are those of the author and not the views of MM&M magazine. For more information, or to be considered as a guest reviewer, please e-mail Kevin McCaffrey at Kevin.McCaffrey@haymarketmedia.com.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Features

Email Newsletters

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Features

Read the complete September 2014 Digital Edition

Read the complete September 2014 Digital Edition

Click the above link to access the complete Digital Edition of the August 2014 issue of MM&M, with all text, charts and pictures.

Medical marketing needs mainstream Mad Men

Medical marketing needs mainstream Mad Men

Agencies must generate emotional resonance with the target audience, not unlike Apple, Pepsi or Nike

Are discounts cutting out co-pays?

GSK's decision to cut Advair's price spurred some PBMs to put it back on formulary. Will drugmaker discounts diminish the need for loyalty programs? How can these programs stay relevant beyond giving co-pay assistance?