Professional Marketing briefs: June 2012

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Professional Marketing briefs: June 2012
Professional Marketing briefs: June 2012

Eisai announced it has opened up shop in Dubai. The new office is located in Dubai Healthcare City, which is a complex that includes hospitals, labs and outpatient medical centers Eisai says the launch supports its focus on the Europe, Middle East and Africa territory. The company announced in March it was expanding its Hatfield site so it could work as a hub for its EMEA operations.

Eli Lilly said its new Erl Wood facility in Surrey, UK, is officially open. The company invested $87.5 million in the new site, which will provide research space for 130 scientists, reported Nature. The new digs are an addition to the company's neuroscience complex, making it the company's second-largest research site (its US Indianapolis, IN, headquarters ranks first), according to the publication.

Cloud-marketing shop Veeva landed the Boehringer Ingelheim account. The company signed up the drugmaker for its cloud-based CRM and iRep for iPad services. BI chose Veeva's cloud after a three-month test, according to a statement issued by Veeva. The system provides updates to sales rep information without requiring an internet connection.
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