Professional Media briefs: December 2013

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Professional Media briefs: December 2013
Professional Media briefs: December 2013

Modern Healthcare wrapped the first phase of an allover redesign. The new print publication rolled out at the end of October with a new logo, bolder graphics and new content sections. ­Editor Merrill Goozner tells MM&M that readers asked for such usable information as best practices, as well as stories that show the impact these recommendations have. A new website is set to go live in the first half of next year.

Harvard Law, Duke and Stanford Universities have launched the open-access publication Journal of Law and Biosciences, published by Oxford University Press. The co-editors-in-chief include reps from all three schools, supported by an editorial board with experience in disciplines including bioethics, philosophy, neuroscience and psychology.

Patrick Wen is replacing Alfred Yung as Editor-in-Chief of Neuro-Oncology as of January. Wen, a neurology professor at Harvard Medical School chairs the American Academy of Neurology's neuro-oncology division, and is pursuing research that centers on novel treatments for brain ­tumors. Outgoing EIC Yung headed up the publication for seven years, increasing the annual publication schedule from four to 12 issues.


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