Ranbaxy facilities searched by FDA

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Federal officials Wednesday conducted a search of the New Jersey offices and manufacturing facilities of Indian generic drugmaker Ranbaxy Laboratories. A company spokesman said in published reports that the action came as a surprise. “We’re not aware of any wrongdoing,” Ranbaxy spokesman Charles Caprariello said in a published report. “We’re cooperating and providing them with (material) even today.” Caprariello said officials from the FDA searched two Ranbaxy sites in New Jersey – a manufacturing plant in New Brunswick and administrative offices in Princeton. He declined to comment on whether the officials removed anything from the sites. “We’re working with the authorities to address the issues and hopefully resolve everything so we can get back to business as normal,” he said. Caprariello told The Wall Street Journal that the management team remains intact and employees are being informed about what has happened. Inquires to the FDA from news agencies about the searches were referred to the Justice Department. A Justice Department spokeswoman told the Associated Press, “We don’t comment on ongoing investigations.” Ranbaxy is based in Gurgaon, India and is that nation’s largest drug company. Last month, the company received approval to make a generic version of Pfizer’s blockbuster antidepressant Zoloft. Other generic drugmakers already had approval for generic versions.
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