RTI to study DTC ad response for FDA

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Under a $4-million contract from FDA, RTI International researchers will look at consumers' responses to risk, benefit and cost information in direct-to-consumer prescription drug ads. The studies will include:

• Attentional effects in pharma ad viewing—Eye-tracking technology will be used to better understand consumer attention to risks and benefit information.

• Caregiver influence on consumer perceptions of ads—Individuals who have had a disease and their spouses or partners will react to ads for a drug to treat it.

• Cost comparison effect—RTI will assess how prescription drug TV ads with cost comparison information may affect understanding of differences in safety, efficacy and side effects.

• TV ad frequency's effect on perceptions—Researchers will explore how the frequency of exposure affects consumers' understanding of a drug's risks and benefits.

• Web and mobile technology promotion content analysis—Researchers will conduct content analyses of DTC prescription drug ads.

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