Senetek PLC taps Michael Rogers PR

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Senetek PLC, a life sciences company focused on anti-aging technologies, has tapped Michael Rogers PR for the launch of its Pyratine-6 product. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Michael Rogers PR will be responsible for corporate positioning, physician outreach and consumer education. “Our target is women 40 years and older,” said Michael Rogers, president. “We'll do some advertising in the trades to start, and we're creating an education campaign for physicians, as well as a consumer campaign,” he said, noting that beauty editors will be targeted, and a forum will be created where women can try the product and blog about it.

Pyratine-6 is Senetek's second generation cytokinin-based skincare treatment used to combat the signs of aging. Senetek developed the Kinerase skincare line in the 1990s. Pyratine-6 does not require a prescription, although it can not be purchased directly in a pharmacy. 

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