SEO PR helps level online playing field

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Websites aren't the only thing to consider when employing search engine optimization (SEO), according to PR practitioners and service providers. Optimizing company press releases for search engines is also an important tool in shaping online communication.

Publishing press releases on widely distributed RSS feeds, such as PR Web, is one way to gain link-backs to a release, a key component of SEO, explained Emily Downward, senior vice president, digital group at Fleishman-Hillard. Downward said augmenting press releases with “assets such as tables, graphs, video clips, and fact sheets” provides online reporters and bloggers with a “complete story;” an incentive for coverage. Choosing keywords for a press release should be based on the predicted search terms used by consumers, including colloquialism. 

“Patients might not search for ‘conjunctivitis,' but they might search for ‘pink eye.' So a press release would need to have both terms,” said Downward.
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