Staging a play to address a timely need

Share this article:
The tragic shootings at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in April underscored the need for education on diagnosing and treating mental health problems.

It was fitting, then, that Pri-Med and educational partner France Foundation in May rolled out the first of a series of national lectures in Norfolk, VA. In this newer version of an activity that began last year, actors are interviewed live by a physician to demonstrate the proper use of a mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) in diagnosing bipolar disorder. Participants can ask questions during the sessions, funded by AstraZeneca.

“From a practical standpoint, [physicians] are literally witnessing how to go through the MDQ,” said Anne Goodrich, Pri-Med group director of physician insights.

The program dates to 2005, when the NIH found that 55% of Americans will develop a mental illness at some point in their lives. Pri-Med then conducted a study of physicians, finding education could have a positive impact.

Nearly 20,000 physicians completed the first round of lectures. Outcomes research showed improvements in competence and adherence to clinical standard.

The patient-interview format was phased in for 2007, and Goodrich said she hopes the role-playing scenario plus handouts and other resources given to audience members will help address remaining learning gaps.
Share this article:

Email Newsletters

More in News

AstraZenca beefs up respiratory portfolio

AstraZenca beefs up respiratory portfolio

AstraZeneca has made an $875-million move to beef up its respiratory pipeline by making Almirall's lineup its own.

Amgen Q2 sales rise, company to lay off up to 2,900

Amgen Q2 sales rise, company to lay off ...

The majority of the layoffs will be in the US.

Doctors want to know how CMS plans to display Sunshine payment data

Doctors want to know how CMS plans to ...

Physician and industry trade groups are asking CMS to explain how context will be provided to the general public around the dollar sums drugmakers ascribe to doctors for things like ...