Everybody knows somebody who wants to lose a few pounds and pharma brands recognize that.

An estimated 45 million Americans go on a diet each year and the weight loss market is around a $71 billion industry. It’s a sizable market, but a crowded one, too, presenting challenges for any product seeking to get the attention of consumers. 

Surprisingly, despite the enormous size of the weight loss industry, much of the messaging around the topic hits the same basic notes: eat less, move more. Still, not enough people are receiving the proper support in their efforts to lose weight.

According to data provided by Currax Pharmaceuticals, only 2% of eligible Americans with obesity are currently under treatment. Enter Currax’s brand campaign for Contrave: “One Size Does Not Fit All,” which encourages an individualized approach built around themes of empathy and empowerment. 

Currax

The first part is reflected in the campaign’s focus on the triggers behind eating, distinguishing between how the different factors — cravings, true hunger and stress — can lead us to reach for a sweet or savory (and often unhealthy) snack. 

That approach was grounded in Currax’s market research, which examined what provokes people to indulge in foods and drinks that contribute to obesity. 

“What came out of talking to a lot of different individuals were situations and struggles like office snacking,” Amy Rosenblum, Currax’s director of consumer marketing, says. “We heard specifically when doing in-person focus groups, ‘Oh, that’s me. When I’m stressed or busy, that is what I’m doing.’”

From that moment of recognition, the Contrave campaign follows with an image of a simple gesture that resonated with the product’s target audience. 

“We have two different models holding up their hands to the stress chips,” Rosenblum continues. “That was powerful — a picture worth a thousand words as she’s saying ‘Talk to the hand, chips. I’ve got this and I can be empowered to say no.’”

The campaign is being rolled out on many fronts: social media, banner ads, paid search, journal ads, waiting room educational materials, as well as a patient-provider discussion guide. Rosenblum says that the website has also been updated in light of the new campaign’s imagery and messaging.

Continuing with the individualized focus that is the overriding theme of the campaign, though the same is true of its approach to a call to action, too. “We have the ability for patients to be able to talk to a doctor via telemedicine from our website,” Rosenblum says. “They can also get our personalized weight loss assessment guide, which helps them start the conversation in-person with their own doctor or go and search to find a doctor near them.”

Additionally, Currax is focused on assuring that anyone can access its product, regardless of a patient’s insurance status. Utilizing its CurAccess offering, patients are provided Contrave at no more than $99 per month. 

Currax

“We have a specialty pharmacy network,” Rosenblum says. “So individuals, if they have insurance, may pay less than $99, but the most that anyone will pay is $99. It is our belief that we need to be part of this solution, supporting patients and making sure Contrave is accessible.”

Beyond increasing awareness of Contrave as a weight-loss solution, Rosenblum hopes the One Size Fits All campaign can help to change the broader conversation. “It acknowledges that weight loss is complex and highlights those unique challenges that individuals have,” she says. 

“The campaign attempts to get to the root of those challenges like emotional eating, and then helps people get the right support that they need so that they can be successful,” she says. “That’s also why we updated contrave.com — so individuals can come, learn and get support in talking to a provider.”