5 authentic and unique campaigns

Trapped - NTMFacts

Trapped is a film that tells the story of Beth, who is heavily burdened by the symptoms of a rare lung disease. Beth is represented by a stop-animation character whose body language clearly shows the misery she experiences with each labored step she takes. You almost forget Beth is an animation, because she feels so genuinely human that you yearn to help stop her suffering. The visual execution helps drive the distinctiveness of this campaign – as well as deep empathy for Beth.

Remember Me - Alzheimer’s Research Initiative

Here's another woman who feels real but isn’t. The illustrative technique of this campaign grabs attention without sacrificing any element of authenticity. The creative inspiration to use a puzzle to communicate the fragments of memory and recognition that an Alzheimer's patient experiences makes this image feel painfully authentic while leaving a lasting mark on your memory.

How Do Nasal Polyps Feel? - Sanofi/Regeneron

This campaign to build awareness of nasal polyps shows a real person, but she isn’t the main feature. Both the authenticity and the differentiating qualities of the ad come from the octopus as a metaphor for how this woman feels. Anyone who has had nasal polyps would find this ad viscerally authentic. And anyone who hasn’t would know exactly how they feel.

One Word - The Constant Therapy app

The copy clearly summarizes the message of this ad, but it becomes a powerful and distinctive story when paired with the dramatic visual depicting how hard it can be for someone with a traumatic brain injury to get the right word out. “I'm trying to say sheep, but is it a shark? Is it a shirt? It's right on the tip of my tongue!” We don’t need to see a person for this to be an emotional and authentic story; we see and understand that person’s struggle.

Headache medicine - Paramax

Here we see a headache visualized not through a person in pain, but through an epic scene of the torture a headache can bring on. It’s an engaging visual – and for anyone who suffers from severe headache pain, this is an authentic representation of the experience. It’s something you don't want to be able to recall.

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5 authentic and unique campaigns

Making an authentic campaign doesn’t mean you must sacrifice differentiation.

Slideshow

Trapped - NTMFacts

Trapped is a film that tells the story of Beth, who is heavily burdened by the symptoms of a rare lung disease. Beth is represented by a stop-animation character whose body language clearly shows the misery she experiences with each labored step she takes. You almost forget Beth is an animation, because she feels so genuinely human that you yearn to help stop her suffering. The visual execution helps drive the distinctiveness of this campaign – as well as deep empathy for Beth.

Remember Me - Alzheimer’s Research Initiative

Here's another woman who feels real but isn’t. The illustrative technique of this campaign grabs attention without sacrificing any element of authenticity. The creative inspiration to use a puzzle to communicate the fragments of memory and recognition that an Alzheimer's patient experiences makes this image feel painfully authentic while leaving a lasting mark on your memory.

How Do Nasal Polyps Feel? - Sanofi/Regeneron

This campaign to build awareness of nasal polyps shows a real person, but she isn’t the main feature. Both the authenticity and the differentiating qualities of the ad come from the octopus as a metaphor for how this woman feels. Anyone who has had nasal polyps would find this ad viscerally authentic. And anyone who hasn’t would know exactly how they feel.

One Word - The Constant Therapy app

The copy clearly summarizes the message of this ad, but it becomes a powerful and distinctive story when paired with the dramatic visual depicting how hard it can be for someone with a traumatic brain injury to get the right word out. “I'm trying to say sheep, but is it a shark? Is it a shirt? It's right on the tip of my tongue!” We don’t need to see a person for this to be an emotional and authentic story; we see and understand that person’s struggle.

Headache medicine - Paramax

Here we see a headache visualized not through a person in pain, but through an epic scene of the torture a headache can bring on. It’s an engaging visual – and for anyone who suffers from severe headache pain, this is an authentic representation of the experience. It’s something you don't want to be able to recall.

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In the ongoing quest for authenticity in our brand work, we run the risk of sacrificing differentiation. Authenticity is often achieved through images of “real” people, but a sea of human faces can be easy to forget. Can we achieve authenticity and humanity while also creating something that’s uniquely distinctive and makes our work memorable? I think these examples vividly demonstrate that we can.