6 campaigns from hospitals fighting for our attention gallery & slideshow- MM+M - Medical Marketing and Media

6 campaigns from hospitals fighting for our attention

Eric Kraus, EVP, executive creative director, H4B Chelsea

Look, I know none of us really wants to go to the hospital, but healthcare facilities are fighting for our attention and business should we need their care. Hospital advertising used to be all about community-based name recognition. However, in the age of the empowered consumer, the importance of branding is paramount to hospitals, and they are finding incredibly imaginative and creative means to carve out niche spaces and specialties. They’re also having a lot of fun doing it.

Montreal Children’s Hospital, Cossette Canada

Objective: Donation drive. If you haven’t seen this yet, go watch it immediately. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftg3JHF1St8) This campaign proves that great creative is born from great insight. Great music helps too. This powerful campaign uses a punk rock anthem to hit us with all the feels — taking us on a roller coaster of emotion — to remind us that a bratty kid is a healthy kid. Also, Canadian hospitals are doing some killer work.

Hospital San José, Ogilvy Mexico

Objective: Organ donation. This campaign communicates life, its end and its revival through a simple illustration of a heartbeat. The copy is brilliantly used as art to create an anagram. It brings humanity and purpose to organ donation. What I love most is how the hospital minimizes its role in the process of saving a life, allowing the donor and recipient to be the heroes of this humbling story.

National Children’s Hospital and Disney Ireland, BBDO Dublin

Objective: Provide comfort. Simple, charming and beautifully executed. If there’s a better way to make kids less afraid of getting an X-ray, I haven’t seen it. The National Children’s Hospital put posters in waiting rooms showing the entire cast of Toy Story going through their own X-rays to distract and put nervous kids at ease. One thing this campaign confirms is that there is no snake in Woody’s boot.

IASO Children’s Hospital, Ogilvy Greece

Objective: Specialty. Using children’s candy to reimagine the Rod of Asclepius, the universal symbol of healing and healthcare, makes it clear what this hospital is all about. The crystallization of the brand promise tells the entire brand story in just five words. This is minimalism at its best. Plus, who doesn’t love gummy worms?

Nisa Hospital, McCann Spain

Objective: Health awareness. Nisa Hospital doesn’t want your business. Taking an unexpected angle, this facility is motivating people to improve their health, so they stay away from needing its services. This visually stunning campaign compares self-inflicted health issues with man-made and natural disasters, forcing us to recognize the consequences of our lifestyle and habits.

DeVito/Verdi

Objective: Differentiation. Selecting this theme, I knew I needed to include a Mount Sinai ad, but the question was which one? Using headlines as the primary visuals and subtle, clean design makes this writer happy. For years, I’ve admired its copy- driven campaigns adorning the walls of my train cars. In a world of fact-checks, the refreshing use of hyperbole and smart word play reminds us of two things: your choice in hospital is vital and that copy can carry a campaign.

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6 campaigns from hospitals fighting for our attention

In the age of the empowered consumer, the importance of branding is paramount to hospitals, and they are finding incredibly imaginative and creative means to carve out niche spaces and specialties.

Slideshow

Eric Kraus, EVP, executive creative director, H4B Chelsea

Look, I know none of us really wants to go to the hospital, but healthcare facilities are fighting for our attention and business should we need their care. Hospital advertising used to be all about community-based name recognition. However, in the age of the empowered consumer, the importance of branding is paramount to hospitals, and they are finding incredibly imaginative and creative means to carve out niche spaces and specialties. They’re also having a lot of fun doing it.

Montreal Children’s Hospital, Cossette Canada

Objective: Donation drive. If you haven’t seen this yet, go watch it immediately. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftg3JHF1St8) This campaign proves that great creative is born from great insight. Great music helps too. This powerful campaign uses a punk rock anthem to hit us with all the feels — taking us on a roller coaster of emotion — to remind us that a bratty kid is a healthy kid. Also, Canadian hospitals are doing some killer work.

Hospital San José, Ogilvy Mexico

Objective: Organ donation. This campaign communicates life, its end and its revival through a simple illustration of a heartbeat. The copy is brilliantly used as art to create an anagram. It brings humanity and purpose to organ donation. What I love most is how the hospital minimizes its role in the process of saving a life, allowing the donor and recipient to be the heroes of this humbling story.

National Children’s Hospital and Disney Ireland, BBDO Dublin

Objective: Provide comfort. Simple, charming and beautifully executed. If there’s a better way to make kids less afraid of getting an X-ray, I haven’t seen it. The National Children’s Hospital put posters in waiting rooms showing the entire cast of Toy Story going through their own X-rays to distract and put nervous kids at ease. One thing this campaign confirms is that there is no snake in Woody’s boot.

IASO Children’s Hospital, Ogilvy Greece

Objective: Specialty. Using children’s candy to reimagine the Rod of Asclepius, the universal symbol of healing and healthcare, makes it clear what this hospital is all about. The crystallization of the brand promise tells the entire brand story in just five words. This is minimalism at its best. Plus, who doesn’t love gummy worms?

Nisa Hospital, McCann Spain

Objective: Health awareness. Nisa Hospital doesn’t want your business. Taking an unexpected angle, this facility is motivating people to improve their health, so they stay away from needing its services. This visually stunning campaign compares self-inflicted health issues with man-made and natural disasters, forcing us to recognize the consequences of our lifestyle and habits.

DeVito/Verdi

Objective: Differentiation. Selecting this theme, I knew I needed to include a Mount Sinai ad, but the question was which one? Using headlines as the primary visuals and subtle, clean design makes this writer happy. For years, I’ve admired its copy- driven campaigns adorning the walls of my train cars. In a world of fact-checks, the refreshing use of hyperbole and smart word play reminds us of two things: your choice in hospital is vital and that copy can carry a campaign.

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