6 campaigns with ideas that will change lives

I Will Always Be Me — VMLY&R NY

Motor neurone disease is a devastating condition that can rob affected individuals of their voices. Up until now, the process of “saving” a patient’s voice could take months and be quite distressing. So Dell Technologies and Intel used AI to voice-bank in a new way — and cut the process from three months to 30 minutes. They humanized the process as well: Affected people read a story about their condition to a loved one, which in turn provides the sound bites to recreate their voice. Staggering. View it here.

Eyedar — Area 23

The ambition of this idea, from Horizon Therapeutics, is undeniable. It showcases an ingenious way of combining iPhones and their LiDAR 3-D-mapping technology to translate shapes into sound — and, in turn, help blind people navigate the world in new way. Life-changing. View it here.

Letters for a Law — BBDO Chile

The use of marijuana in Chile is illegal, meaning people with Parkinson’s disease may not be able to access a treatment that could benefit them. It drove Fundación El Herbólogo to create a “product demonstration” unlike any other: It recorded people with Parkinson’s trying to write a petition to government authorities. The twist: The foundation had the patients do so before taking medication and then after taking it. This was basic direct work at its very best. Brutally simple.

The Big Sneeze — 21Grams

To encourage parents to get their children vaccinated against the flu, AstraZeneca created an outdoor immersive film. In it, the “flu culprit” breaks the fourth wall while discussing her symptoms, then times her own sneeze with a wet spray onto unsuspecting onlookers. Needless to say, the audience was disgusted — and hopefully prompted to visit their GP. Powerfully direct. View it here.

Skin Cancer — The Leith Agency

Here’s an idea that’s hot off the press, metaphorically: A poster for Melanoma U.K. with a warning about the harm of ultraviolet light … but printed in sunscreen on ultraviolet paper. When the paper degrades in the sun, we’re left with a warning about the danger the sun poses to our skin. Learn more here.

It’s Your Vagina — McCann Health New Jersey

Proving that you don’t need to be high-tech to be outstanding, this wonderfully crafted piece of work promotes Phexxi, a new form of non-hormonal birth control, and features actress Annie Murphy. It’s a delightful combination of performance and art direction, with just the right amount of innuendo. View it here.

1 of 6

6 campaigns with ideas that will change lives

The best creative work has the power to show the world a problem, and a solution, in a single package. Here are 6 recent favorites selected by VCCP Health's Brett O'Connor.

Slideshow

I Will Always Be Me — VMLY&R NY

Motor neurone disease is a devastating condition that can rob affected individuals of their voices. Up until now, the process of “saving” a patient’s voice could take months and be quite distressing. So Dell Technologies and Intel used AI to voice-bank in a new way — and cut the process from three months to 30 minutes. They humanized the process as well: Affected people read a story about their condition to a loved one, which in turn provides the sound bites to recreate their voice. Staggering. View it here.

Eyedar — Area 23

The ambition of this idea, from Horizon Therapeutics, is undeniable. It showcases an ingenious way of combining iPhones and their LiDAR 3-D-mapping technology to translate shapes into sound — and, in turn, help blind people navigate the world in new way. Life-changing. View it here.

Letters for a Law — BBDO Chile

The use of marijuana in Chile is illegal, meaning people with Parkinson’s disease may not be able to access a treatment that could benefit them. It drove Fundación El Herbólogo to create a “product demonstration” unlike any other: It recorded people with Parkinson’s trying to write a petition to government authorities. The twist: The foundation had the patients do so before taking medication and then after taking it. This was basic direct work at its very best. Brutally simple.

The Big Sneeze — 21Grams

To encourage parents to get their children vaccinated against the flu, AstraZeneca created an outdoor immersive film. In it, the “flu culprit” breaks the fourth wall while discussing her symptoms, then times her own sneeze with a wet spray onto unsuspecting onlookers. Needless to say, the audience was disgusted — and hopefully prompted to visit their GP. Powerfully direct. View it here.

Skin Cancer — The Leith Agency

Here’s an idea that’s hot off the press, metaphorically: A poster for Melanoma U.K. with a warning about the harm of ultraviolet light … but printed in sunscreen on ultraviolet paper. When the paper degrades in the sun, we’re left with a warning about the danger the sun poses to our skin. Learn more here.

It’s Your Vagina — McCann Health New Jersey

Proving that you don’t need to be high-tech to be outstanding, this wonderfully crafted piece of work promotes Phexxi, a new form of non-hormonal birth control, and features actress Annie Murphy. It’s a delightful combination of performance and art direction, with just the right amount of innuendo. View it here.

1 of 6

The best creative work has the power to show the world a problem, and a solution, in a single package. These ideas can win awards. But more importantly, they can change the world. This work proves our industry is in a rich vein of form — whether it’s embracing innovative tech, using clever UX, nailing direct approaches or wowing with experiential or print. Ideas like these give me hope for our ability to help reshape the world in a more positive, safe and inclusive way. As I apply another layer of sunscreen, I hope they’ve done the same for you.