6 campaigns that highlight underrepresented groups gallery & slideshow- MM+M - Medical Marketing and Media

6 campaigns that highlight underrepresented groups

Tuesday Poliak, chief creative officer Wunderman Thompson Health

Health impacts every person on our planet regardless of gender, color, sexual orientation or ability. Yet, when it comes to health and pharma advertising, broad representation has, for the most part, been ignored. If we want all people to have healthier outcomes, we must ensure they see themselves in our stories and know they matter. Our industry is finally starting to show up differently, to talk to diverse audiences, to be more inclusive of all kinds of people. And this is worth seeing.

Prep Up for the Prevention of HIV, Gilead/Descovy

“For kings, this queen and you royals in between …” Wait, is this a pharma ad? The campaign steps up to speak unapologetically to its diverse audience. It’s rare to see a queen in a brand TV spot, let alone a pharma spot. That’s progress! It’s important for members of the LGBTQ+ community to see themselves in these ads proudly taking care of themselves, each other and their health. More, please.

Ice Cold Faces, GlaxoSmithKline/Sensodyne

Tooth sensitivity isn’t selective, so it’s refreshing to see a relatively conservative consumer brand choose not to be. In an evolution of GSK’s Faces of Sensitivity campaign, in which people with sensitive teeth grimace after biting into cold treats, this work features an all-LGBTQ+ cast. It’s time more brands become sensitive and represent all kinds of people in their ads. Because whether we’re drag queen Gingzilla or not, we all want to eat ice cream.

Take Two, American Diabetes Association

Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent among African-Americans than it is among white people, and with it comes an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Thus, it couldn’t be more important for Black audiences to see themselves in the fight against it. This TV spot with Angela Bassett goes one important step further: It parts with the old approach of using scary statistics to motivate change. Take Two represents a fresh way to inspire people to say no to heart disease, and that’s worth another take.

See Progress Differently, Caplyta

More and more health and pharma ads are choosing to show a broad range of diversity in their casting, which is great. See Progress Differently reflects the many kinds of people who can have schizophrenia – and as simple as that sounds, it makes a big impact. The more people that can see themselves in the story of mental health, the more people are likely to speak up and get help. That’s the power of diverse and inclusive casting.

Thisables, Ikea

One in five people are living with a disability, which makes the disability community one of the largest and fastest growing minority groups. Yet, they have largely been left out of our brand stories. Some brands are deciding to see them both as individuals and as a powerful consumer force. To that end, Eldar is a 32-year-old copywriter with cerebral palsy. Thanks to Ikea’s line of smart hacks that make its furniture accessible, Eldar no longer has to feel like a “cripple” in his own home. ThisAbles is unforgettable in its simplicity and impact, which is why it won the Cannes Lions Grand Prix for Health and Wellness in 2019.

One In A Million, #Touchofcare, Vicks

Little by little, health and pharma marketing is opening its aperture and revealing there is no such thing as “normal” nor any need for “perfect.” Vicks’ One In A Million is powerful and mighty in its portrayal of a person who happens to have a rare skin disease. The family’s story is unforgettable and, not surprisingly, it spread like wildfire online. #TouchOfCare proves that the more brands care, the more people will care about brands.

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6 campaigns that highlight underrepresented groups

Our industry is finally starting to show up differently, to talk to diverse audiences, to be more inclusive of all kinds of people.

Slideshow

Tuesday Poliak, chief creative officer Wunderman Thompson Health

Health impacts every person on our planet regardless of gender, color, sexual orientation or ability. Yet, when it comes to health and pharma advertising, broad representation has, for the most part, been ignored. If we want all people to have healthier outcomes, we must ensure they see themselves in our stories and know they matter. Our industry is finally starting to show up differently, to talk to diverse audiences, to be more inclusive of all kinds of people. And this is worth seeing.

Prep Up for the Prevention of HIV, Gilead/Descovy

“For kings, this queen and you royals in between …” Wait, is this a pharma ad? The campaign steps up to speak unapologetically to its diverse audience. It’s rare to see a queen in a brand TV spot, let alone a pharma spot. That’s progress! It’s important for members of the LGBTQ+ community to see themselves in these ads proudly taking care of themselves, each other and their health. More, please.

Ice Cold Faces, GlaxoSmithKline/Sensodyne

Tooth sensitivity isn’t selective, so it’s refreshing to see a relatively conservative consumer brand choose not to be. In an evolution of GSK’s Faces of Sensitivity campaign, in which people with sensitive teeth grimace after biting into cold treats, this work features an all-LGBTQ+ cast. It’s time more brands become sensitive and represent all kinds of people in their ads. Because whether we’re drag queen Gingzilla or not, we all want to eat ice cream.

Take Two, American Diabetes Association

Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent among African-Americans than it is among white people, and with it comes an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Thus, it couldn’t be more important for Black audiences to see themselves in the fight against it. This TV spot with Angela Bassett goes one important step further: It parts with the old approach of using scary statistics to motivate change. Take Two represents a fresh way to inspire people to say no to heart disease, and that’s worth another take.

See Progress Differently, Caplyta

More and more health and pharma ads are choosing to show a broad range of diversity in their casting, which is great. See Progress Differently reflects the many kinds of people who can have schizophrenia – and as simple as that sounds, it makes a big impact. The more people that can see themselves in the story of mental health, the more people are likely to speak up and get help. That’s the power of diverse and inclusive casting.

Thisables, Ikea

One in five people are living with a disability, which makes the disability community one of the largest and fastest growing minority groups. Yet, they have largely been left out of our brand stories. Some brands are deciding to see them both as individuals and as a powerful consumer force. To that end, Eldar is a 32-year-old copywriter with cerebral palsy. Thanks to Ikea’s line of smart hacks that make its furniture accessible, Eldar no longer has to feel like a “cripple” in his own home. ThisAbles is unforgettable in its simplicity and impact, which is why it won the Cannes Lions Grand Prix for Health and Wellness in 2019.

One In A Million, #Touchofcare, Vicks

Little by little, health and pharma marketing is opening its aperture and revealing there is no such thing as “normal” nor any need for “perfect.” Vicks’ One In A Million is powerful and mighty in its portrayal of a person who happens to have a rare skin disease. The family’s story is unforgettable and, not surprisingly, it spread like wildfire online. #TouchOfCare proves that the more brands care, the more people will care about brands.

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