Company news: Time, Takeda, Amylin, PwC

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Time Inc. has rebranded its targeted marketing division as Targeted Media Health and refocused it exclusively on pharma and other healthcare advertisers. In addition to leveraging the company's magazine portfolio, the division offers OTC and wellness brands “educational and health-related content delivered directly to consumers at multiple touch points,” from online to point-of-care, the company said. “Adding targeted digital and mobile offerings, as well as an in-home magazine component, makes Targeted Media Health a one-stop solution for fulfilling the dimensional elements of any pharmaceutical brand initiative,” said VP managing director John Kenyon.

Takeda and Amylin dissolved their three-year-old collaboration to develop compounds for the treatment of obesity. The move follows the August 2011 discontinuation of work on the partnership's lead candidate, pramlintide/metreleptin, which was in Phase II clinical trials for use as a twice-a-day injection.

PricewaterhouseCoopers' Health Research Institute is fielding a regulatory analysis team. The three-person team “tracks and analyzes legislative and regulatory issues across the US health landscape, delivering timely business insights to help executive decision makers navigate rapid change,” and includes former Teva director of regulatory affairs Bobby Clark and journalist Matt DoBias of Modern Healthcare and other publications. 

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