Pfizer hypes Advil line extension with TV ad, personal shopper offer

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Pfizer hypes Advil line extension with TV ad, personal shopper offer
Pfizer hypes Advil line extension with TV ad, personal shopper offer
Pfizer Consumer Healthcare is launching an Advil line extension with a contest to win a personal shopper for “Black Friday,” the Friday after Thanksgiving, when bargain-hunting holiday shoppers pack stores.

Pfizer is hawking Advil Congestion Relief, a new Advil-plus-decongestant formula that promises to alleviate sinus pressure by easing nasal inflammation. The company is also airing TV ads by ghg titled “Don't blame mucus.” The message: snot's not the problem – inflammation is, as a man in a green shirt that reads “Mucus” attests. Advil, he says, is “The right sinus medicine for the real problem.”

Mr. Mucus, the star of Reckitt Benckiser's Mucinex campaign, will doubtless feel vindicated.

For the Black Friday campaign, shoppers at malls in the Jersey City, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and San Francisco areas can text for a chance to win a “personal Black Friday Decongester” who will help a hundred of them avoid congested stores. One grand prize winner in each market will also win a $1,000 gift card.

Pfizer flagged a recent poll that found around 70% of Americans avoid crowded or congested areas during the holidays.

Ketchum is handling PR for the Decongester campaign.
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